The Mist: Episode 3 Recap and Review

Throughout my long 39 years on this planet (whew), I have discovered something…

Things are not always what they seem to be.

Sometimes, the cookie appears to be a chocolate chip cookie, but it has…

*Gasp*

Raisins!  And that is why I have trust issues, in case you were wondering!

And my ex masquerades as a human being.  Not the reason I have trust issues, I still blame the cookies on that, actually.

People can surprise you too.  And sometimes this is a good.  Sometimes a bad thing.  And sometimes, it can be seen as either.

This also applies to fictional characters.

Especially characters…

In a…

Wait for it…

Stephen King story!

*Insert shocked looks right here, in case you forgot which blog you were reading*

But that is the beauty of a King story.

Characters behave in all kinds of ways.

Sometimes, they are cringe-worthy at best, or downright vile and disgusting at worst.

Characters such as Jim Rennie, Henry Bowers and even Roland Deschain have all fallen on this spectrum.

Sometimes, characters step up.

Danny Torrence, Jack Sawyer and Nick Andros are also characters who fall on this end of the spectrum:  the good guys, who we can count on to save the day, when we need them to.

And then there are characters who fall on both ends of the spectrum.

We peg them as bad guys (or even good guys), but these characters surprise us with their actions, and make us re-think their motives.

Characters such as Jack Torrance and Larry Underwood would be good examples of this.  And these characters are often King’s most interesting characters, since they are complex, and often easy to relate to.

King writes about people, and how ordinary people behave in extraordinary circumstances.  That is one of his strengths as a writer (other than being able to scare people into a change of pants!)

Spike’s adaptation of the novella The Mist is no exception.

Sure, there are monsters in this adaptation (a couple, at least), but so far, the story is being told in true King style.

In other words, we are focusing on the human horrors.  And there seem to be more than enough to go around, on that front.

So, without further ado, here is the recap and review of episode 3 of The Mist, titled Show and Tell.

And, as always:

Continue reading

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The Mist: Episode 2 Recap and Review

So, last week was the first date.

And it was awkward, but it went well enough that I accepted the offer of a second date.

While this date was still a little awkward, there was something different about it.

I began to feel something.

Perhaps, there may be a spark after all.  And I want more.

In other words, I watched the second episode of The Mist this weekend, titled Withdrawals.

And no, the show is not perfect.

But again, it intrigues me.

I don’t feel like I am wasting my time watching it.  And I want more.

I am, dare I say it, developing feelings.  I am starting to care.

*gulp*

I see  a certain charm in this show.

It may suffer from some horror movie cliches (I am able to pick out the next death a little too soon.  And a white guy tripping and falling?  Cliche much?)

But at the same time, there is something unexpected to the show.  A victim of date rape, trapped in the mall with her accused rapist.

An addict who thinks she is suffering hallucinations brought on by withdrawals.

In other words, not elements you typically associate with horror movies.

So, let us get down to business, and review and dissect the second episode of The Mist!

And, as always:

Continue reading

The Mist: Episode 1 Recap and Review

First dates.

Aren’t they so grand?

Having to make small talk, and having to somewhat hide your “true self,” at least for…oh say…30 minutes of the date…

You know, like your obsession with a certain famous author, known in some circles as The Master

Well, the above describes how my first date with my now husband went.

It was a little awkward, having to make small talk.

And I did succeed in hiding my obsession with Stephen King for approximately 30 minutes (I think am being a little generous probably, but my memory eludes me on how quickly that topic came up.)

I am lucky girl, I have been married for nearly nine years to my understanding, awesome husband.  No more first date awkwardness.

I can be without my makeup and covered in dog hair and it’s okay.

Oh, and I no longer have to hide my Stephen King obsession.  In fact, he enables it…yay me!

However, I did have a first date of sorts this weekend…

No, I didn’t hang out with Raylan Givens or Jax Teller.  Or Aragorn.

I confess to spending a lot of time with my fictional boyfriends (my marriage is open like that) but that was not the case this weekend.

However, the subject of Stephen King did come up.

In fact, you could say that The Master was the subject of the date…gasp!

In other words, I watched the series pilot of the show The Mist.

And it was a little awkward.

A little uncomfortable at times.

Things felt a little forced and unnatural.

But, I still had fun, so it was not all bad.  Far from it, in fact.

And the pilot tried, it really did.  I see enough potential in it that I am willing to go out on another date, just to see where things go.

After all, without first dates, there would never be second dates.  Or third dates…

Or nine years and counting marriages…

Yeah, you get the point.

So, without further ado…

Let us review and dissect the pilot episode of The Mist.

And, as always:

Continue reading

Nerdy and Sleepless!

If you wish to hear your favorite nerd live and in the flesh, breaking down the novel Insomnia (written by The Master, natch) and geeking out over more than a few things, click the link below, as she was a guest on The Dark Tower Radio Podcast, and got to participate in a great meeting of the minds!  Long days and pleasant nights, and enjoy!

 

 

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/dark-tower-radio/e/49910648?autoplay=true

Shit Weasels and Seeing the Line: My Review of Dreamcatcher

My name is Leah and I have a confession to make.

No, not the nerd thing…you knew that!

Here goes nothing…

Gulp, I confess that…

I can’t stay away from Derry, Maine!

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Yes, I know that particular town has its issues, and that I probably cannot fix those issues, even though it is my nature to try and fix things.

Yes, the presence of a certain homicidal clown is constantly felt, despite the fact that there were brave folks who tried to put that clown to bed (or is it Hell?)

I know that Derry attracts its share of…well…the unusual (and that’s putting it mildly.)

But still, I can’t stay away.  I guess I just fall for bad…um…towns (not sure if fictional towns have a gender, so roll with me.)

Yes, I am talking about a fictional town in a Stephen King book…

Stephen King mit Katze "Clovis", tierischer Held des Films "Schlafwandler". Der Meister des Horrors wird am Sonntag (21.09.1997) 50 Jahre. Mit 50 hat er mehr als 30 Romane veröffentlicht, ein Sachbuch, fünf Geschichtensammlungen und neun Drehbücher. dpa (zu dpa-Korr vom 17.09.1997) nur s/w

I know, a Stephen King!  Just humor me and pretend you are at least a little surprised, eh?

And obviously, The Master has a fetish for evil towns…

I mean, he keeps coming back to Derry, right?  So that means its only sorta bad, right?

Well, as my aunt used to say:  Leopards don’t change their spots!

The homicidal clown may have been sent to whatever Hell (or other ungodly realm) from whence It came, but that doesn’t mean that Derry is on the straight and narrow now.

Nope, not at all!

Luckily, Uncle Stevie realized that there were many more stories to tell about Derry, so he decided to tell them (duh.)

And the novel Dreamcatcher is one of those stories.

NYX

NYX

Dreamcatcher is an interesting mashup, so to speak.

On the one hand, it is a story about childhood and the friends we make as children (similar to It.)

On the other hand, it is also a science fiction novel, with elements of horror.  Shit weasels, anyone?

So, with that being said, let’s take a trip back to Derry…

Hopefully, you see the line…

And, as always:

Homer spoiler


Synopsis

The book begins with an introduction of four men:  Henry, Pete, Jonesy and Beaver.  The four men have been friends since childhood, and are still friends in the present day.  However, it is clear that the men are not ordinary, as all four seem to possess telepathic powers, which they usually use to accomplish every day tasks, such as finding lost car keys.  A fifth friend by the name of Douglas is mentioned, but it seems that the men have fallen out of touch with Douglas.  Once a year, all four friends gather at a cabin in the woods they call Hole in the Wall, where they go hunting and reminisce about their childhood.

One spring, Jonesy is hit by a car while crossing the street.  The accident is almost fatal, but Jonesy is able to to make enough of a recovery by winter, and is still able to take his annual vacation with his friends.

The trip to Hole in the Wall starts off ordinarily enough, but things quickly become strange.  One morning, Pete and Henry head to the grocery store to pick up supplies, while Beaver also heads out on an errand.  Jonesy is left alone at the cabin, where he almost shoots what he first thinks to be a deer.  However, Jonesy quickly discovers that his target is not a deer, but a man named Rick McCarthy.  It turns out that Rick became lost in the woods, and has found his way to Hole in the Wall.  Jonesy takes the stranger in, offering him food and shelter.

Jonesy then finds out that Rick is no ordinary lost traveler.  Rick appears to have traveled 50 miles in the course of what he believes to be one day, and Jonesy later finds out that Rick thinks that the date is the date three days prior.  Rick is also missing several teeth, and does not appear to notice that he is missing these teeth.  Additionally, Rick appears to be extremely flatulent, and his burps and farts have an unusual smell.

Beaver returns, and Jonesy offers Rick the spare bedroom so he can get some rest.  After Rick retires, Jonesy and Beaver discuss what to do about their guest, and agree that they need to get help for him, and quickly.

In the meantime, Henry and Pete are driving back to the cabin from the grocery store.  We learn that Henry has been suffering depression, and is considering suicide.  The men also discuss some rumors heard at the grocery store, which include stories about missing hunters and bright lights in the sky.  However, the talk is interrupted when Henry swerves to avoid hitting a woman standing in the middle of the road, which causes the vehicle to crash, due to the serious weather conditions.

Pete and Henry survive the accident, although Pete is seriously injured and his leg is likely broken.  Pete and Henry try to speak to the woman they narrowly missed hitting, but the woman appears to be almost comatose, although she does inquire about someone named Rick.  And like Rick, she also suffers from extreme flatulence accompanied by an unusual odor.

As Henry attempts to help the woman, he and Pete see strange lights in the sky.  The woman becomes hysterical, crying “they’re back.”  Finally, Henry is able to call her down, and the three head off to find some sort of shelter from the impending blizzard.  However, the woman collapses, and Henry is forced to carry her to shelter.  While they are walking to shelter, Pete and Henry begin to discuss a fifth childhood friend, whom they refer to as “Duddits.”  Duddits was afflicted with Down’s Syndrome, and the men have been thinking a lot about Duddits recently, for some reason.

Back at the cabin, Jonesy and Beaver play cards and wait for Henry and Pete to return.  Their game is interrupted when Beaver steps outside, and notices what appears to be a large group of forest animals in mass exodus from the forest, along with strange lights.  Things become stranger when they return to the cabin, and notice that Rick is no longer in bed.  They also notice blood on the way to the bathroom, and discover that Rick is in the bathroom and in distress.

Outside, there are helicopters in the sky.  Beaver tries to signal for help, but is told that the area is under quarantine, and that the situation will be resolved in 24-48 hours.

Henry attempts to walk back to Hole in the Wall to seek help.  He leaves Pete with the woman they found on the side of the road.  They believe the woman’s name to be Becky, although they are not entirely sure of that fact.  Even though Pete is responsible for watching Becky, he decides to head back to the vehicle to retrieve the beer he purchased earlier.  Both men begin to recall they day they met their friend Douglas Cavill, or Duddits, many years ago.

One day, when all four boys were in junior high, they walk home together from school.  There is nothing unusual about the day, and the boys talk about the usual things that junior high boys talk about.  However, their talk is interrupted when they hear the heartbreaking sounds of someone crying.

The boys find the source of the crying:  a young man who is obviously mentally handicapped and being bullied by some of the students who attend the local high school.  One of the bullies is Richie Grenedeau, who had played quarterback for the high school football team, but was allegedly removed from the position due to injury.  The boys become angered by the bullying, and resolve to stand up for the young man.

Pete, Jonesy, Henry and Beaver take a stand against Richie Grenedeau and his friends, and the bullies back off.  The four boys learn the name of the young man they rescued from the bullying:  Douglas Cavill, who is nicknamed Duddits.  Duddits is afflicted with Down’s Syndrome and attends a nearby special school.  The boys return Duddits to his home and parents, and a friendship is begun.  Nearly every day, for the remainder of their school years, the boys accompany Duddits on his walk to and from school, to protect him from the bullies.  They also spend time with Duddits, and include him in their activities whenever possible.  However, Pete, Jonesy, Henry and Beaver grow up, and become distanced from Duddits, who remains a perpetual child.

The story flashes back to the present.  Jonesy and Beaver break down the door to the bathroom, and discover that McCarthy has fallen into the bathtub.  McCarthy is now dead, with a large hole in his backside.  There also appears to be something living in the toilet that has exited McCarthy.  Beaver immediately sits down on the toilet to trap the creature, and Jonesy goes to look for tape in an attempt to contain the creature.

Beaver drops his toothpicks that he has the habit of chewing, especially when stressed.  He reaches down to grab them, and this proves to be a fatal mistake.  The creature escapes from the toilet, and immediately attacks Beaver.

Jonesy returns to the house and finds Beaver battling a creature resembling a parasite.  Beaver loses the battle when the creature attacks and kills him.  Jonesy tries to flee, but sees a creature that resembles an alien from a science fiction TV show standing in bathroom, along with the creature that killed Beaver.  Jonesy is then possessed by the alien-like creature, and is unable to escape.

In the meantime, Beaver’s surviving friends receive a telepathic signal that Beaver is now dead.  These friends include Duddits, who is still living with his mother in Derry, Maine, the boys’ childhood home.  Duddits is also terminally ill with leukemia, and is distressed to find out that his friend is now dead.

The story switches to the point of view of two military men, Owen Underhill and Abraham Kurtz.  Underhill and Kurtz’s unit has been dispatched to Maine to deal with the alien invasion.  We learn that “the grays” are telepathic, and transmit a sort of fungus, that when inhaled by humans, also makes humans telepathic, at least temporarily.  Underhill, Kurtz and the rest of the unit do battle with the aliens, even though the aliens claim to surrender.

Henry finally makes it back to Hole in the Wall.  There, he discovers the body of his friend Beaver, along with the parasite-like creature that killed Beaver.  Henry is forced to battle the creature, which is still alive, and sets fire to the cabin to destroy the creature, along with the eggs it has laid.  While he is there, Henry somehow deduces that Pete is now dead (due to a battle with a similar creature) and that something has also happened to Jonesy.

After destroying the cabin, Henry heads back to the site of the vehicle accident.  There, he discovers the body of the woman who he almost hit earlier.  The woman also appears to have been attacked by the creature.  Henry notices that she is covered by a reddish gold fungus, but that the fungus appears to be dying.

Henry decides to attempt to walk back to civilization.  As he is walking, he again begins to think of his friend Duddits.  However, as he attempts to reach civilization, Henry is accosted by the soldiers that have been dispatched to handle the crisis in Maine.

We learn that the body of Jonesy has been possessed by one of the aliens, whom Jonesy thinks of as Mr. Gray.  Jonesy experiences a series of long flashbacks, which include the accident he suffered earlier that year, along with the time he spent in the hospital.  Jonesy is able to recover some memories:  he remembers that he thought that he saw Duddits that day, and that is why he was not paying attention when he crossed the street, along with the fact that he nearly died in the ambulance.  Somehow, Jonesy’s accident relates to why the alien creature is able to take over his body.  Mr. Gray is able to kidnap Pete, and force Pete to help him in his mission.

Henry arrives at the base that the military has set up.  Kurtz is in charge of the operation, but appears to be mentally unstable. Kurtz tells Underhill of the cover story he will spin in regards to the alien invasion, but really intends to kill all the civilians being held captive at the compound, along with Underhill.

Jonesy, whose body has been stolen by Mr. Gray, steals a vehicle from an unsuspecting driver.  Mr. Gray forces the driver to stab himself in the eye, even though he has already hijacked the man’s vehicle.  Jonesy attempts to hide all of his memories of Derry and Duddits from Mr. Gray, as he suspects that the alien has a dangerous plan involving Derry.

Jonesy also recalls another incident from his childhood.  Shortly after meeting Duddits, Jonesy and the rest of his friends make their first trip to Hole in the Wall, where they accompany Beaver’s father on a hunting expedition.  One night, all four boys have the same disturbing dream:  they dream that Richie Grenedeau has died in a car accident, and that they were responsible for the death.  When the boys awaken, they try to convince themselves it was just a dream, but they are not successful. The boys place a telephone call to Duddits, who is also distressed because he experienced the same dream, which has actually come true.  Even then, Jonesy and his friends realize that Duddits has somehow gifted them with the powers of telepathy.

Henry is able to pull Underhill aside, and tells Underhill that Kurtz has something sinister in mind, and begs Underhill to help him and the other civilians.  Henry explains to Underhill that the aliens have passed on an organism known as “byrus”, and that there are different strains of the byrus.  The worst strain is the one that afflicted McCarthy and his friend Becky, which is the case of symbiosis gone wrong.  However, most strains of byrus are harmless, although they do result in the carrier experiencing low-grade telepathy.  Henry tells Underhill that he is different, due to his childhood experiences, but that Jonesy is the most different of all four of them, and that is what poses a potential threat.  Finally, Underhill agrees to help Henry, so that that Jonesy may be rescued from whatever has taken over his body.

Jonesy continues to struggle for control over his body from Mr. Gray.  Finally, he comes to a sort of compromise with Mr. Gray and agrees to help him.  Jonesy realizes that Mr. Gray has stolen another truck which contains a passenger:  a dog infected with the byrus.

Back in Derry, Duddits has also sensed the death of his friend Pete, which upsets him.  However, the next morning, Duddits’ mother Roberta finds him dressed, and demanding his old lunchbox, as if he is awaiting the arrival of his friends, as he had in the days of his childhood.

Henry and Underhill use their telepathic powers to awaken the other civilians, who are asleep in a barn that is part of a makeshift military base.  They warn the other civilians of what Kurtz intends to do, and the civilians rebel against Kurtz and his soldiers.  Some are killed, but some are able to escape.  Henry and Underhill also escape, and head to Derry to meet up with Duddits, who can help them rescue Jonesy.

Underhill and Henry continue on their journey to Derry, stealing a vehicle from some young men.  Henry recalls another incidence from his childhood, when he and his friends were able to find a missing girl, with the help of Duddits.  Henry realizes that Duddits’ is a dreamcatcher of sorts, due to his telepathic abilities.

Henry then receives a telepathic communication from Jonesy.  Jonesy is frightened, and warns Henry that Mr. Gray has something dangerous planned.  Henry further realizes that Jonesy’s brain is different due to his accident and near death experience, which has allowed Mr. Gray to take over his body.  Mr. Gray continues to behave erratically, murdering a state trooper.

Kurtz has discovered that Underhill is AWOL, and begins to look for him.  Kurtz contacts Underhill on the radio to attempt to persuade him to abandon his mission with Henry, but Underhill refuses.

With the help of Duddits, Jonesy is able to trick Mr. Gray into consuming raw bacon, which makes him ill, buying more time for Henry, Underhill and Duddits.  Mr. Gray continues his journey to Boston, where he plans on unleashing the byrus into the water supply, by using the infected dog as a vessel.

Eventually, Mr. Gray abandons the vehicle he is driving, and attempts to use the dog to contaminate the water supply in Boston.  However, with the help of Duddits and Henry, Mr. Gray is defeated, and Jonesy is in possession of his body again.  Duddits pays dearly for his efforts, dying shortly afterwards.  Before he dies, Duddits tells Henry that he loves him.

In the meantime, Underhill shoots the weasel-like creature that emerges from the dog, killing it.  Underhill is then shot by Kurtz, who has caught up to Henry and his friends.  Henry then defeats the Kurtz and the remaining soldiers, rescuing Jonesy from certain death.

Several months later, Henry is visiting Jonesy at Jonesy’s summer cottage.  Both men have recovered from their ordeal, physically at least.  Duddits’ mother grieves the loss of her son but has moved on with her life.  The men muse about their experience, even though they feel lucky to have survived it, along with wondering when the planet will again be visited by extraterrestrial beings.


My Thoughts

Ok, let me get one thing out of my system…

Actually, I probably don’t want to get this one one thing out of my system, since that means certain death, along with the WORST FLATULENCE EVER!

byrus

In case you haven’t figured it out, I am referring to the shit weasels.

(In case you can’t tell, I had to work the “shit weasels” into the title of this review.  It just wouldn’t be right other wise.  You’re welcome!)

Shit weasels.  How much more eloquent can you get?  Where on Earth (or is it in Hell?) does The Master come with up with this stuff?

King has said that he is not too proud to go for the gross out.  And we are reminded this in Dreamcatcher.  Again and again, we are reminded.

While I am not that much of a fan of the gross-out in the horror story, it does have its place.  Mostly, the gross out is funny.  And Dreamcatcher is also a book with a lot of funny.

dreamcatcher-6

And the shit weasels are just one of the funny things in Dreamcatcher.  I know that King was on LOTS of drugs when he wrote this one (more on that later), so often I wonder if one of the side effects of those drugs were “Caution:  taking this and writing a novel about aliens will likely make the user write about farts, burps and other bodily functions not discussed in polite society?”

Speaking of funny, let’s talk about the Beave for a moment…

Beaver isn’t described as being particularly attractive, at least in the physical sense.  But when I evaluate my book boyfriends, I try not to be so superficial, you know?  Otherwise, I might miss out on a really great romance!

Beaver 1

Yes, Beaver is the man in this book.  He is killed off pretty quickly, but still manages to make quite the impression.

First off, Beaver is funny.  Any book boyfriend of mine must have a sense of humor.  That is a prerequisite for all of my literary relationships, no exceptions.

And Beaver does have quite the sense of humor.  And he’s not afraid to sprinkle a copious  a fair amount of profanity to get his point across.  “Kiss my bender.”  “Fuck me Freddy.”  “Fuck-a-row.”  “Fuck-a-ree.”  All Beaver-isms.  And I unabashedly use them as part of my vocabulary.  After all, there is nothing like a good swear fest, Beaver style, after a frustrating day at work.  Or sitting in traffic.  Or standing in line at a crowded restaurant.  Or sitting.  Or standing…well, you get the point!

But perhaps, most importantly, Beaver has a good heart.  There was truly a beautiful soul behind the glasses and the potty mouth that would make a drunk sailor blush.  He stood up for someone who was helpless and being bullied.  And he comforted that someone by singing him a lullaby…swoon!

Duddits 1

I think that’s when Beaver had my heart: after he rescued Duddits (with the help of his friends) and sung to him.  And “fit neek” (fixed Duddie’s sneaker, in case your Duddits-to-English dictionary is not working.)

My only complaint about Beaver is that he left so fast…damn you, errant toothpicks and shit weasels that can’t stay in the toilet like a good shit weasel!

I also loved the not so subtle jab at Dubbya, aka Okefenokee.  The description of Okefenokee and his actions after the alien invasion of Maine was eerily similar to what happened right after 9/11.  I know that this book was written before the 9/11 tragedy, but The Master’s description of The Leader (well, the leader at time, anyway) was so close to what happened after 9/11, it made me wonder if all those painkillers had perhaps given him some kind of clairvoyance…hey, anything is possible, right?

As stated before, Dreamcatcher was the first book that King wrote after his vehicle accident.

And it shows…

Not that this a bad thing.  Dreamcatcher is still an enjoyable book.  But, it gets a bit un-wieldly in spots.  It’s almost as if the painkillers took over in those spots.  And the painkillers do not have an eighth of the talent possessed by The Master!

Quality: Original. Film Title: Dreamcatcher (2003). Pictured: (L to R) DAMIAN LEWIS, THOMAS JANE, TIMOTHY OLYPHANT and JASON LEE in Castle Rock Entertainment's and Village Roadshow Pictures' science fiction/horror film Dreamcatcher distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures. Photo Credit: Doane Gregory. Copyright: Warner Bros. Pictures 2002. For further information: please contact The Warner Bros. Press Office on 020 7984 5000.

I did think that this book dragged at parts, especially in the “present day” setting.  And the ending was a bit anti-climactic.  Really, the best the alien could come up with was to use a dog to contaminate the water supply?  And that alien seems like he kind of sucked at being an alien, since Jonesy and Henry were able to defeat it so quickly, practically with their eyes closed…

However, this book was saved by the good parts.  One of these parts was the flashbacks to the boys’ childhood.

I loved the description of the friendship between the four (later to be five boys).  The way King described, I felt like I was right there, in the thick of it.  Even the mundane details, like how the boys get out of school one fateful afternoon, and are eager to catch a glimpse of *a kitty cat*, aka female nether regions.  That made me laugh, and it brought me back to my own childhood, when things seemed to be so much simpler.

Beaver 3

Speaking of nostalgia, part of Dreamcatcher is set in Derry.

Yes, that would be the same Derry that boasts a homicidal clown as a tourist attraction.  The same Derry where a bad ass man named Ralph Roberts saved the universe single handed-ly, but did not even receive a lousy t-shirt.  That Derry!

I loved how King was able to work in elements of his books set in Derry (It, mainly) but was still able to tell an entirely new story.

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Dreamcatcher and It are similar tales, at least on the surface:  both deal with friendship, small towns and bullying.  However, that is about all the two books have in common.  In one, the friendship is formed because an outside force uses the children (and later the adults) to defeat an evil monster.  In the other, the friends are drawn together first, because they have common interests and so forth, and then later used to defeat evil (Richie Grenedeau as children, alien invaders as adults.)  In Dreamcatcher, the friendship really is lifelong, unlike in It, where the friendship is so brief and only serves the purpose of defeating Pennywise the Clown.

In Dreamcatcher, the threat of Pennywise the Clown never really seems to be far away. Henry and his friends may not have had the misfortune of being children during one of the “cycles”, but Pennywise and the town of Derry were a constant presence in this book.  I loved the references to the missing children in Derry, and how it was a bigger problem in Derry than most other places.  I also loved Jonesy’s recollection of the big storm in 1985.  As any King fan knows, that was the year that the Losers Club laid waste to Pennywise (maybe.)  It was such a funny feeling to get the perspective of someone who was not involved in that battle, but was still a part of Derry.

Oh, and “Pennywise Lives.”  Did anyone else shudder when Jonesy found that graffiti, or was that just me?  Someone in Derry has a sick sense of humor!  Or there is the alternative:  Pennywise really does live!  Both of these are pretty scary, actually.

Pennywise 9

And before I wrap this review up, let’s give someone his due…

Yes, that someone would be Duddits.  And I cannot give enough accolades to poor Duddits.

There was so much to love about Duddits in this book.

First of all, there was Duddits himself.  I have a friend who refer’s to those with Down’s Syndrome as beautiful souls, and she could not be more right in that statement.  Like Henry, Jonesy, Pete and Beaver, I felt that all was right in the world when Duddits showed up on the page.  How could anyone not be happy when he/she was in the presence of Duddits?  Just reading about Duddits made my day much better.

It is no secret that King writes about man’s inhumanity to man.  Books such as It, Under the Dome, Hearts in Atlantis and even the Dark Tower series are filled with examples of this.

Rennie

So, the uninitiated may be surprised to learn that King is equally adept at writing about the opposite: his characters can also treat each other wonderfully, and go above and beyond in the name love and friendship.

Duddits and his friendship with Henry, Beaver, Jonesy and Pete is a prime example of King’s ability to write about the good that some are capable of.

Very early on in the book, we get a glimpse of a good deed:  four adolescent boys do an extremely brave thing and stand up to the neighborhood bully on behalf of someone who appears to be much weaker.  This is not something we would think of most adolescents as capable of, not even Henry and his friends.  After all, before the encounter with Richie Grenedeau, Henry and his friends are focused on viewing certain parts of the female anatomy, not confronting a bully who turns out to be a coward.  But just like that, the tone of the story changes, and I knew that these guys were something special.

And I was right:  all five were something special.  The boys continue their friendship with Duddits.  In junior high and high school, all that matters to most is fitting in and peer acceptance.  However, the friendship with Duddits transcends those barriers, and enriches the life of Duddits, who experiences something he was previously lacking in his life:  acceptance.  Henry, Beaver, Pete and Jonesy all have their lives enriched by the friendship with Duddits as well, referring to Duddits as their “finest hour.”  Their friendship with Duddits is the glue that holds them together even into adulthood, when most childhood friendships slowly fade away.

Even in adulthood, Duddits is still…well, Duddits.  The others grew up and moved on, but Duddits remained a child.  However, Henry is able to pick up right where he left off, so to speak, and the old bond is renewed.  In fact, Duddits is overjoyed to reunite with Henry and have one last adventure with him, while Henry is overcome with guilt for not staying in touch.  But that doesn’t matter to Duddits, as Duddits does not think in those terms and seems to be incapable of anger or resentment.

dreamcatcher-3

Duddits is truly the hero of the book.  He makes the ultimate sacrifice in order to help his friends one last time.  He saves the lives of his friends Jonesy and Henry, along with (potentially) the lives of thousands of others.  And there is no resentment or anger.  Only love.  After all, that is what drives a hero:  love.


So that’s it for Dreamcatcher.  Join me next month as we take a trip next door…well, maybe not literally next door, but to a world nearby on The Tower when I review and dissect The Eyes of the Dragon!

Tune in next month…same bat time, same bat channel!

batman and robin


Connections

Like all of King’s books, Dreamcatcher is set squarely in the King universe.  Here are some of the connections I noticed:

-The most obvious connection is the fact that Dreamcatcher is set in the town of Derry.  Derry is central to several King novels, including It, Bag of Bones, 11/22/63 and Insomnia.

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-Jonesy finds graffiti on a statue stating “Pennywise lives.”  Pennywise the Clown was the monster faced by the Losers Club in the novel It, and was supposedly defeated in 1985.

derry connection

-The storm of 1985 is mentioned.  This storm took place when the Losers Club faced the monster It in final battle.

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-Jonesey’s mind trick to escape Mr. Gray after Mr. Gray takes over his body is somewhat similar to Susannah’s method of dealing with the entity Mia in The Song of Susannah.

Song of Susannah 1

-Duddits possesses PSI abilities.  Several novels and short stories deal with this topic and contain characters who possess these abilities, including Carrie, Low Men in Yellow Coats (of the collection Hearts in Atlantis), Everything’s Eventual (part of a collection of the same name), Firestarter and the Dark Tower series.

carrie-1

-A sign is seen for the town of Jerusalem’s Lot.  This is the location for the novel ‘Salem’s Lot.

Salem's lot 2

Shawshank State Prison is mentioned.  This is the main setting for the novella Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption, which is part of the collection Different Seasons.

Red and Andy

-Duddits is somewhat similar to the characters Tom Cullen (The Stand) and Sheemie (Wizard and Glass), in that he suffers from a mental “handicap” but also possesses extraordinary abilities.

Nick

Dreamcatcher is not the only novel featuring extraterrestrial visitors.  Tommyknockers and Under the Dome also deal with this topic.

tommyknockers

 

 

 

 

 

 

11/22/63: Episode 5 Recap and Review

Just don’t tell ’em I’ve gone crazy
That I’m still strung out over you
Tell ’em anythin’ you want to
Just don’t tell ’em all the truth
Yeah, don’t tell ’em all the truth

Jason Aldean, The Truth

Sometimes, telling the truth can be the hardest thing. Even when it may be the best thing to do, it can still be the hardest thing.  Or even the most painful thing.

Roland 1

However, lies will come back and bite you in the ass, so to speak.  After so many lies, the house will be blown down by the big, bad wolf, and no amount of running will keep you away from the wolf, aka the truth, and you are forced to face it.

big bad wolf

And our hero, Jake Epping, discovered exactly that in the latest episode of 11/22/63, simply titled The Truth.  Finally, the lies have begun to catch up to Jake, and have consequences.  Jake is forced into letting someone in on his secrets, or he may lose what is most precious to him.

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So, without any further ado, here is my recap and review of The Truth, the fifth episode of the mini series 11/22/63.  And, as always:

Homer spoiler


Synopsis

The episode begins where the previous episode left off:  Sadie pays a visit to Jake, and discovers his recordings of the Oswald family.  Sadie’s trust in Jake is shattered, and she breaks it off with Jake after they argue.  Sadie leaves and Jake is upset by the argument.

It gets even worse for Jake the next day at school, as Principal Simmons invokes the morality clause in Jake’s contract, after finding out about the recordings.  Jake is forced to resign from his teaching position, and Ms. Mimi appears to be the only one who still believes in him.

The day that Oswald attempts to assassinate General Walker is drawing near, and Jake and Bill discuss their plans for that day.  If Jake can prove that Oswald shot Walker, then it proves that he is also the one who shot Kennedy, according to Al’s theory.  Bill questions why Oswald would shoot Walker and Kennedy, when the two men are political polar opposites, but Jake does not have an answer.  Jake plans to follow George de Mohrenschildt, while Bill will shadow Oswald.  Jake wants to kill Oswald then and there if he can prove that Oswald tried to assassinate Walker.  Bill questions what the future will hold when the deed is done, and expresses some interest in returning to 2016 with Jake.  Jake is taken aback by this request, and does not know what to say to Bill.

Jake returns to his house in Jody and begins packing up his few belongings.  He receives a phone call from Sadie’s ex husband, Johnny Clayton, and discovers that Clayton is holding Sadie hostage.  Jake abandons the plans concerning Oswald, and tells Bill that he is on his own for shadowing Oswald.

After arriving at Sadie’s house, Jake is invited to the kitchen by Clayton.  Clayton attempts to force Jake to drink a glass of beach, as punishment for his involvement with Sadie.  Clayton also reveals that he has hurt Sadie quite badly, slashing her face.  Jake is horrified but refuses to drink the bleach.  Sadie knocks down a bowl of apples, and begins to mock her ex husband, while Jake reaches for a shard of glass.

Jake is interrupted, however, by the arrival of two of his students, who are dropping off a gift basket for Sadie.  He shoos them away and tries to hint that the police need to be called.

While Jake is dealing with Clayton, Bill continues to try to talk to Marina Oswald.  He shares a cigarette with her, and shows her a picture of his deceased sister.  They are interrupted by Oswald, who comes outside to find Marina.  Oswald gives Bill a book about Karl Marx, telling Bill to read it, and then they will talk.

Back at Sadie’s house, Johnny appears to have the advantage, after the students leave.  Jake appears to be on the verge of drinking the bleach, but throws the bleach on Johnny’s face at the last minute.  This allows Jake and Sadie to take refuge behind the couch.  Jake tricks Johnny by throwing his watch across the room, and then stabs Johnny in the face with a fire poker.  Johnny seems dazed, and Sadie takes advantage of this and shoots him with his gun.

An ambulance takes Sadie to the hospital, and Jake is reminded that the medical care is 1960’s medical care, not 2016 medical care.  A cop questions Jake about the shooting of Johnny Clayton, but Principal Simmons intercedes and takes Jake to the hospital, telling the cop that Jake can give his statement there.  Principal Simmons also expresses his approval over the death of Johnny Clayton.

Oswald leaves the apartment, telling Marina that he is going to the library.  Bill follows him, per Jake’s instructions.

At the hospital, Jake finds out that Sadie is in critical condition and is unable to leave to help Bill.  The cop questions Jake again, but seems satisfied when Jake tells him that he enjoyed killing Clayton.

Bill has arrived at the site where Oswald will attempt to assassinate Walker.  All is quiet for a little while, but Bill is distracted when he sees a woman who he believes to be his sister.  Bill runs after the woman, but realizes his mistake when he catches up with her.  Bill also realizes that he has lost any chance to prove that Oswald is actually linked to the assassination attempt on Walker.

At the hospital, Jake sees Walker being admitted for the injury he suffered at the hands of the assassin, and knows that Bill has failed in his attempt to stop Oswald.  A phone conversation with Bill confirms this, and Bill is extremely upset.  Jake abandons the call and speaks to the doctor in regards to Sadie.  The doctor tells Jake that Sadie will live, but the scar on her face will remain there for the rest of her life.

Jake visits Sadie in her hospital room and admits that he has not been honest with her.  Jake then tells Sadie that he is a time traveler from the future, and that he loves her.


My Thoughts

 

Dear abomination otherwise known as Under the Dome,

If ya wanna know how it’s done, tune in and watch 11/22/63.  It has everything that you didn’t:  good writing, good imagery, stays faithful to its source material and oh yeah…acting talent!

Sincerely,

A fan who is beginning to believe in book to screen adaptations again.

Ok, that may be a wee bit harsh.  Maybe I should leave poor Under the Dome alone for a bit, and allow it to finish licking its wounds…maybe!

Rennie

Ok, let’s shift back to 11/22/63.  And after being slightly more than halfway through (which is a little depressing, but I will try not to think about it this series ending…sniff…), it is clear that 11/22/63 is doing right.  And this is no small feat, especially for something based on a novel by The Master.  Many King adaptations are mixed at best.  However, my feelings on 11/22/63 are pretty clear-cut:  nothing but love, love and more love!

stephen-king-cover-ftr

Oh, and I did not miss the Easter egg this time around…

easter eggs 1

Yes, the vehicle driven by the douchebag ex husband should be one that is quite familiar to any Stephen King junkie:

Christine 3

Oh, and speaking of the ex husband…what an acting job!

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This was one character in the book who was not very well fleshed out (in my opinion, at least).  The mini series has taken some liberties with this characters, and these liberties have actually paid off on the screen.  By fleshing out his character a little more, the writers have been able to do a nice job building up to his attack on Sadie and Jake, along with his death.  And yes, I know that this character actually committed suicide in the book, but Sadie defending herself and shooting provided an emotional payoff, which works really well for the screen, since it invests the viewers even more in Sadie and Jake, and their relationship.

T.R. Knight, the actor who was cast as Johnny Clayton, turned out to be a smart casting choice for this character.  Most abusers do not carry around a sign saying “Hey, I am a piece of shit who beats on women” (that would have saved me a lot of heartache, actually).  Instead, they appear as a normal personal.  Maybe the abusers are even charming.  And that is exactly how Johnny Clayton appears:  he is normal.  He is charming (how can that Texas drawl not be charming?)  He was a top salesman at his job (wonder if anyone actually drank that bleach?)  But Johnny is clearly a psychopath.  Anyone who puts a close pin on his junk on his wedding night (of all nights) and then rapes his bride obviously has some issues.  T.R. Knight was able to portray this character and make him scary (I think he belongs in the universe of human King villains.  He would be in good company with Eldred Jonas, Charles Burnside, Norman Daniels and the rest of the crew, actually), but not a caricature, which is too easy to do.  So props on the writing and casting of an important “major minor character.”

Maerlyn's rainbow

And the standoff between Jake, Sadie and Johnny.  Those scenes were done beautifully, and tastefully too.  I had been wondering if the mini series would show the full extent of Sadie’s injuries.  This is not my favorite part of the story (King can indeed horrify even when the book is not a horror story).  It’s gruesome, and it’s also sad.  However, I should not have wondered, as the mini series is not holding back on anything, it seems, and this part of the story is no different.  Sadie’s injuries were shown, but the vibe I got was more sympathetic, as opposed to scary.  And that is a good thing, in terms of the development of Sadie’s character and Jake and Sadie’s relationship.

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I also loved the imagery that was used in the standoff between Jake, Sadie and Johnny.  The bowl of red apples.  The reddish lamp.  And there was that reddish light…again.  I kept hearing, “You shouldn’t be here” in my head.  And the use of red served to remind us that this is a work based on a Stephen King book, and he is the master of modern horror, after all.

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And I have to give out even more props:  Sarah Gadon.  Sadie is one of my favorite female King characters (and just one of my favorite characters in any book, period), and Sarah Gadon has done a perfect job of bringing her to life.  In the book, we mainly see Sadie through the eyes of Jake, since the story is told in the first person.  However, this a screen adaptation, and the interpretation is a bit different.  So far, Gadon is doing a wonderful job of making Sadie…well…Sadie.  That’s the best I can describe it.  I always thought that there was something very sweet about Sadie, yet also a little sad, or maybe even wistful.  Sadie is a woman who is still young, but maybe a bit older than her years would suggest.  And she is strong, as well.  I thought Sadie shooting her ex husband was actually empowering, and works well for the mini series.  Sarah Gadon  is able to bring the sadness, wistfulness, sweetness and the older than her years to this character, and I love her for it, I really do.  I nominate her for some award, but I am not just not sure which.  She does deserve recognition for it, and hopefully she gets it.


 

Well, that’s it for The Truth.  Join me next week as we review and dissect episode 6, titled Happy Birthday, Lee Harvey Oswald. Although I think that this is one celebration that probably does not involve birthday cake in any way…

Tune in next week…same bat time, same bat channel!

batman and robin

 

 

 

 

11/22/63: Episode 4 Recap and Review

So, I think I need to get my eyes checked again…

Seems like they were a little..well…leaky earlier this week…

Yes, Peyton Manning has retired from football.  That’s a good reason for the old eyes to leak.  Especially after that farewell speech…so thanks, Peyton…I needed a cry and didn’t know it!

super bowl 50 1

So, I should have learned my lesson, right?  Go watch something on TV that is light hearted and fun, like say…something based on a Stephen King novel?  Sounds like just the ticket…

Well, apparently my eyes didn’t get the memo, since I suffered more leakage after watching The Eyes of Texas, the fourth episode of the mini series 11/22/63.  Nope, not an easy night for the old eyes the other night…

So, thanks, Peyton!

And thanks, Uncle Stevie!

Stephen King

And just for good measure, let’s thank Obama while we are at it, since I am sure he doesn’t get thanked enough…so thanks, Obama!

In all seriousness, The Eyes of Texas is a pivotal episode in the mini series 11/22/63, especially in terms of character development.  Jake was treated to some character development.  We got to know the Big Bad, aka Lee Harvey Oswald, even better.  Sadie is slowly being drawn out of her shell.  Heck, even Cletus er Bill was treated to some character development.

card-1963

The show also dealt with some serious issues, such as domestic abuse, rape and a few others, while still reminding us that we are watching a show where a guy travels back in time to change the past, which does not want to be changed and will let you know in various, non-subtle ways that it does not want to be changed.  Just another typical episode, in other words.

So, without further ado, here is my recap and review of The Eyes of Texas, the fourth episode of the mini series .

And, as always:

Homer spoiler


Synopsis

The episode begins with Jake spying on the Oswalds yet again.  Lee poses for a picture with his rifle, although his wife, Marina, tells him that he looks ridiculous.  Bill also sees Marina and waves at her.  Marina waves back, and seems not to be bothered by the fact that Bill has been stalking her.

Jake and Sadie have begun a relationship, although they try to keep it a secret, so they don’t endanger their jobs at the high school.  Jake sings a Beatles song to Sadie, forgetting that the Beatles have not been discovered yet.  However, they are interrupted when Principal Deke Simmons walks in.  Deke gives Jake a lecture on how he and Sadie are role models and must practice discretion.  Deke also gives Jake a card that has the name and address of a hotel that he and Sadie can use to meet and practice discretion.

That night, Ms. Mimi pays Jake a visit at his home.  She has deduced that Jake is not who he says he is, since she was unable to obtain his immunization records.  Jake concocts a cover story that he is in a FBI witness protection program because he testified against some members of the Mafia.  Mimi is skeptical, but agrees to keep Jake’s secret.  Mimi also hints to Jake that he should tell the truth about himself to Sadie, as their relationship has become more serious.

Sadie meets Jake at the hotel room, and the two consummate their relationship.  Jake realizes that he needs to tell Sadie something, but their time is cut short when Jake realizes that someone has been watching them and taking pictures.  Jake is convinced that the CIA is on to him and attempting to blackmail him, so he will drop his plans of preventing the assassination of Kennedy.

Bill and Jake follow Oswald and George de Mohrenschildt to what they believe is a top secret CIA meeting.  However, the meeting spot is actually a brothel.  They attempt to spy on Oswald and de Mohrenschildt, but the cops raid the place, and Bill and Jake are arrested.

Deke bails out Jake and Bill the next morning, and tells Jake that he still must show up to his teaching job the next day, as he has no substitute lined up.  Mimi reprimands Jake for his disheveled look, but is coughing and appears to be ill.  Jake also catches Sadie talking to her ex husband and confronts her about it.  Sadie becomes upset, and tells Jake about her marriage.  She says that Johnny attached a close pin to his penis on their wedding night.  When Sadie laughed at him, he hit her.  He then hit her again and raped her.  She thought that she had escaped Johnny, but he was able to track her down through her mother and has refused to grant her the divorce.  Sadie is then convinced that Jake is repulsed by her past, and tearfully drives away.

Bill arrives at school and tells Jake that de Mohrenschildt will be taking Oswald to what may be an important meeting.  Jake follows Oswald and tries to listen in on the conversation, but is interrupted by a barking dog.  When Jake tries to quiet the dog, he realizes that he is face to face with Johnny Clayton, Sadie’s ex husband.  Clayton tries to intimidate Jake, but Jake turns the tables on him, telling him that he will hurt him if he does not stay away from Sadie.  Jake realizes that Johnny took the pictures of him and Sadie, not the CIA.  Jake also repeats the story of Johnny and Sadie’s wedding night, telling him that he will tell the secret if Johnny does not stay away from Sadie and does not grant Sadie the divorce.  Johnny is afraid and appears to back down.

Jake then pays Sadie a visit, giving her flowers and chocolates.  He tells her that he knows that she is not perfect, but that he still loves her.  They embrace, and someone appears to be watching them.

Back at the house, Jake finds Bill lying on the couch, drunk and angry.  Bill is frustrated because Oswald mistreats his wife, and wants to do something about it.  Jake stops him, telling him he can’t interfere.  Later that night, Bill finds Marina sitting on the steps, beaten and sad.  He offers her a cigarette and a shoulder to cry on.  Jake apologizes to Bill, affirming that he cannot attempt his quest without Bill, and that they are a team.

At school the next day, Mimi is nowhere to be found.  Deke tells Jake that she is out sick, but appears to be angry with him for something.

Later that day, Sadie stops by Jake’s house with baked goods and a nice note.  She cannot find Jake, however, and calls out for him.  A shadowy figure follows her.  Sadie then finds Jake’s surveillance tapes, and listens to Oswald’s conversation in Russian with his friends.  Jake arrives at the house, and a bewildered Sadie wants to know just who he is.


 

My Thoughts

Usually, my feelings about on-screen adaptations of books are mixed, at best.  Some are watchable (It, cough, cough).  Some are instant classics (give one up for Green Mile, yo).  And then there was the abomination otherwise known as Under the Dome that I simply cannot excuse.

pennywise

But, here we have 11/22/63.  And my feelings on this one are not mixed.  Well, maybe they are mixed, but it’s a mixture of love and pride.  Maybe like how a parent feels on his/her kid’s first day of school, where he/she “debuts” to the world?  Or that could be hyperbole.  Well, it’s not far off, though.

Yes, there have been changes from the book.  But remember, the book is told in the first person, so changes are necessary.  Again, a book adapted to the screen will have a different face, so to speak, and there is nothing wrong with that.  In fact, changes are necessary, as television is a visual medium, and the story should be able to reflect that.

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I have not talked much about James Franco in prior posts.  And there is a reason for that:  we were only a few episodes in.  But now, we are halfway through, so let’s start talking about James Franco and what he has done with the character of Jake Epping.

Normally, I am hesitant to make such statements about an actor “being born to play a certain character.”  Different actors can bring different takes to a particular role (Heath Ledger and Jack Nicholson, who both played Batsy’s arch-nemesis are great examples) and the finished product can still be good, even if it’s different from the other actor’s interpretation.  And I still believe that.

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But it does seem that Franco fits the role of Jake Epping very well.  Maybe even perfectly, although again, it is early.  Sometimes, low and slow in the way to go (kind of like soul food, actually).  And that’s just what Franco, along with the producers and the writers, are doing with the character of Jake Epping.  Jake comes off as apathetic in the first couple of episodes.  And lost as well, as it seems his life is going nowhere.  But, slowly, that is changing.  Jake is beginning to care about something bigger than himself (stopping the assassination of the leader of the free world).  And he is beginning to care about the people around him.  He stands up against the racism that was accepted in 1961 (and still is in some ways), by helping Ms. Mimi after she has suffered needlessly because some bigot won’t sell her gas.  He helps his present day friend Harry Dunning by preventing the murder of his family.  And he has fallen in love.

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Which brings me to my next point:  the love story.

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While 11/22/63 is a story about time travel, social justice and war written by the master of modern horror, it is also a love story.  The love story between Jake and Sadie is one the main plots of the book, and is one of the greatest in any book I have ever read, let alone a Stephen King book.

And when I watched this episode the other night, I shivered.  Almost uncontrollably, actually.  And no, that’s not because my husband needs to have our house at the temperature of a meat locker in order not to sweat profusely.

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In other words, the mini series is doing a smoking job (see what I did there) with the love story aspect of 11/22/63.  And one of the things that is helping this part is the chemistry between Franco and Sarah Gadon, the actress who plays Sadie.  Every look, every kiss and the overall way that they interact with each other is just so believable.  And sweet.  And tender.  And sexy.  Very sexy, as a matter of fact.  And when Jake makes that speech about how life isn’t all flowers and chocolates, but how he loves everything about the person standing in front of him…I was no longer shivering, but fanning myself instead…woo!

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I also need to give props to the other part of this love triangle:  Johnny Clayton, Sadie’s ex husband.  In the book, this character is not as big a player as he is in the mini series, and he does not have as much interaction with Jake.  However, this has been modified a bit for the mini series, and it works.  In fact, it works really well.  That interaction between Jake and Clayton was just beautiful.  There are no other words to describe it.  I loved how Jake threatened to hurt that bastard if he didn’t grant Sadie the divorce and stay away from her.  I also loved the fact that Jake used a bit of blackmail as well…

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Remember how I was saying that his episode managed to incorporate some serious themes?  Well, the above would be one of them.  In other words, spousal abuse.  Anyone who has read at least some of King’s work (or seen some of his movies) knows that domestic abuse of all kinds is a theme in many of his stories.  11/22/63 is no different.  We saw in the episode The Kill Floor, with the character of Frank Dunning.  And we have seen again this week, with The Eyes of Texas.  The show does not try to hide the fact that Clayton abused his wife, and is still trying to control her, even though she has left him.  To add further insult to injury, no one will acknowledge the abuse.  Even worse, Sadie is blamed for the troubles (a sign of the times then and still true in some ways today).  The mini series even managed to make Sadie’s story more heart-breaking than it was the book, which makes Sadie to be even more of a sympathetic character and makes us root for her (and Jake) even more.

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The portrayal of domestic violence in the mini series has also provided an opportunity for character development from someone else. This character would happen to be Bill.

Now, I have stated that Bill is well…annoying.  I understand the need for this character, in terms of advancing the story.  But I still find him annoying.  However, I have grown a little more tolerant of him after this week’s episode.  His feelings in regards to Marina Oswald and the treatment she endures from Lee (which are likely related to the feelings he has in regards to what Frank Dunning did to his sister) make him a little bit more sympathetic in my eyes.  His interest in the Oswalds has actually gone from creepy to almost sweet.  I still scratch my head over this guy, but at least I can feel something other than annoyance towards him.  So, props, mini series…keep it up!

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Well, that’s it for The Eyes of Texas.  Join me next week for the recap and dissection of episode 5, titled The Truth.

Tune in next week…same bat time, same bat channel!

batman and robin

 

 

Picture This: My Review of Duma Key

Art is life.

Life is art.

Art imitates life.

Life imitates art.

Art…well…

Anyone who knows me knows that art is extremely important to me.  It is one of my favorite forms of expression.  I am always drawing, painting, woodburning, glass etching…

So I guess I am a little obsessed…this guy might understand something about that…

Roland 14

But art has kept me.  Kept me from losing my mind when my ex had legal troubles of the worst kind, and that was all he would talk about, day in and day out.  Kept me from feeling completely worthless after I finally left my ex (yes, the same one), and going out of my mind with loneliness.  Recently, I had to euthanize my poor 15 year old dog Igloo, who had been my best friend for about the same length of time.  This was one of the most agonizing decisions that I had to make, and I questioned it constantly, never sure that I was doing the right thing, even though I saw the gratitude in her eyes at the very end.  The next night, I finished a woodburning piece with the phrase “Stand and be true” included on it.  The irony was not lost on me, reminding me once again that coincidence had been cancelled.  The tears came, but it was cathartic and I needed it.  Once again, art healed me when I was at my most broken.

critters 1 007

So, art has kept me.  Kept me in the land of the living when it seemed nothing else would.  And I imagine that is true for most creative people.  We may appear to be escaping, but really, we do it so that we can stay engaged with “the real world.”  And art, of any kind (literature, paintings, comic books, you name it), is just one of the few things that makes “the real world” just a little less cold.

And one those things that makes our world a little less could is…wait for it…

Yes, a Stephen King book!

Stephen King

Don’t be surprised, it is this blog, after all.

The art of Stephen King has been making my world brighter for the past 25 years, and I imagine that he has been brightening the worlds of many, many other folks as well.  He is an artist, and much needed warmth in our world.

I am also sure that, like most other artists, King needs his art to stay engaged, especially after the horrific accident that nearly claimed his life.  I would like to think that thoughts of writing more books and finishing his magnum opus helped to keep him engaged with “the real world”, and provided a source of healing for him when he needed it the most.

Enter the novel, Duma Key.  On one hand, it is a ghost story…Perse on her ghost ship…shudder.  But on the other hand, Duma Key is about art, and the healing qualities that art can have on the human spirit.  Once again, King has taken the ghost story, and elevated it so that it is no longer a ghost story, but something far more than the tale of a haunted island.  But then again, we are talking about The Master, after all!

Without further ado, here is my recap and review of Duma Key.

Oh, and don’t forget:

Homer spoiler


 

Synopsis

At the beginning of Duma Key, we are introduced to a man named Edgar Freemantle, or Eddie.  Edgar is a seemingly ordinary man:  he is married, owns a successful construction company and is the loving father to two children, Ilse and Melinda.  However, all of that changes when Edgar is in a near fatal accident on a job site, when his truck collides with a crane.  As a result of that accident, Edgar loses his right arm.  He also suffers severe brain damage, and his personality undergoes a drastic change for a time.  Edgar is unable to control his anger after the accident and stabs his wife Pam with a plastic butter knife, and also tries to choke her.  Edgar also has trouble with language, and is unable to find the right word for common objects and even the people he loves.  This contributes to his anger problems, but Edgar undergoes much therapy and slowly begins to recover.  However, Edgar’s marriage never recovers from the fallout of the accident, and Pam files for divorce shortly afterwards.  Edgar is devastated, but understands how Pam feels and does not contest the divorce.  Edgar also begins seeing a psychiatrist, Dr. Kamen, who gives him a doll to use as a punching bag for his rages.  Edgar names the doll Reba, and becomes attached to her.  Dr. Kamen suggests that Edgar consider a geographic change. Edgar agrees, and decides to temporarily re-locate to Florida from his Minnesota home, and picks a house on the island of Duma Key, located off the coast of Florida.  Dr. Kamen also suggests that Edgar take up a hobby to keep his mind off of his injuries and other problems.  Edgar remembers that he used to enjoy drawing, and packs his art supplies when he moves.  Money is no object, as the success of Edgar’s construction company will allow him to live out the rest of his life in comfort.

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We are also introduced to a small girl who seems to have suffered a similar injury to Edgar’s, but the events are indicated to have taken place many years ago.

Edgar arrives on the island of Duma Key and is introduced to Jack Cantori, a college student who will be driving Edgar to places he needs to go, and also assisting him with duties such as grocery shopping.  Edgar immediately likes Jack and is glad to have his assistance.  Edgar also falls in love with his rental house on first sight.  The house is nicknamed “Big Pink”, and Edgar finds immediate peace in his surroundings.

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Edgar continues to convalesce at Big Pink and Duma Key.  He also continues to hone his drawing skills, sometimes adding in a surreal element to his work.  Many people, including his psychiatrist, Dr. Kamen, tell Edgar that he has a real talent and should consider a second career in the arts.  Edgar walks on the beach, which helps him with his mobility and makes him less dependent on pain killers.  On the beach, he sees a middle aged man and elderly woman, and the man waves at Edgar every time he sees them.  Edgar also finds out the his daughter Ilse has a new boyfriend, and is somehow able to draw a picture of the young man, even though he has never seen him.  Edgar  finds out that Ilse is engaged, through his clairvoyant visions.

Ilse visits Edgar shortly after Christmas, and the two take a drive on the island to the lone other house on the island.  However, this drive does not go well.  Ilse becomes violently ill and Edgar’s missing limb begins to madly itch.  Edgar is able to drive his daughter back to the house so that she can recover.  While Ilse is resting, Edgar is overcome with an urge to draw, and draws a picture of what appears to be his anger doll Reba surrounded by an ocean of tennis balls.  Ilse is impressed with the drawing, so Edgar gives it to her, naming it The End of the Game. Edgar receives a call from the owner of the other house on the island, an elderly woman named Elizabeth Eastlake.  Elizabeth is kind and cordial to Edgar, but warns him that Duma Key is a dangerous place for daughters, and to immediately send Ilse away from the island. Ilse also confirms that she is indeed engaged to her new boyfriend, and Edgar experiences a sense of dread, and thinks that Ilse is moving too fast in her relationship.  Ilse also convinces Edgar to invest in some paints and canvases, which he does after dropping her off at the airport so that she can return to college.

After Ilse leaves, Edgar continues to hone his craft, becoming better and better at painting.  He also researches limb loss and “phantom limb syndrome”, and finds out that there are others who have experienced strange happenings after the loss of a limb.  Edgar asks Pam for a pair of her old gardening gloves, telling her that he wishes to include those in one of his paintings.  However, he is really trying to find out if Pam is dating another man by using his clairvoyant abilities.  Edgar continues his walks on the beach, and the middle aged man tells him to come join him and the elderly woman when Edgar is able.

We also learn more about the young girl who suffered a head injury years ago.  The young girl has also developed the ability to produce extraordinary drawings that sometimes predict events that the little girl could have no knowledge of.

Edgar decides he wants to use Pam’s gloves to try paint his ex-wife.  He almost talks himself out of the attempt, but falls down on the floor.  However, when he falls, he is able to touch the floor and save himself with his missing right hand.  Edgar then appears to become possessed, and produces a painting of ex-wife.  The painting reveals that Pam has had a relationship with a man in California who lives in her parents’ neighborhood.  Edgar also learns that Pam has had an affair with his friend and accountant, Tom Riley.  Edgar is upset by this vision, but tries to forget about it and move on.  He titles the painting “Friends With Benefits.”

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Edgar finally makes the acquaintance of the middle-aged man that he has seen while walking on the beach.  The man is named Jerome Wireman, but tells Edgar that most people call him “Wireman.”  In talking with Wireman, Edgar learns more about the island and its peculiar history.  Wireman tells him that his employer, Elizabeth Eastlake, owns the house Edgar is renting and a few other properties.  Wireman also informs Edgar that his rental house has been occupied by several artists, the most notable name being Salvador Dali.  Wireman invites Edgar to come visit him at Elizabeth’s Eastlake’s home, and Edgar agrees to take him up on the offer sometime.

Dali painting 1

When Edgar returns home, he receives news that a local art dealer wishes to look at his paintings, which makes him nervous.  However, Edgar does not cancel the appointment, as he has promised his daughter that he would meet with the art dealer.  Edgar also sees a vision of his friend, Tom Riley.  Tom appears to be dead, and Edgar thinks that he will commit suicide.  Edgar is unable to reach Tom, but is able to reach Wireman.  Edgar tells Wireman that he needs to talk, and Wireman invites him for a visit the next day.

Edgar visits Wireman and tells him of all the strange happenings since he moved to the island, including his vision of Tom Riley.  Wireman tells Edgar that he must talk to Pam about Tom Riley, even though the conversation may be uncomfortable and that Pam may not believe his story.  Edgar also meets Elizabeth Eastlake, who immediately knows that Edgar is an artist, and shows him a sketch that Salvador Dali had given her when he stayed in the house.  We also learn that Elizabeth has Alzheimer’s disease, and is not always of clear mind.  Before he leaves, Edgar reads to Elizabeth from a book of poetry, as she enjoys being read to.

Per his promise to Wireman, Edgar contacts Pam in regards to Tom Riley.  Pam is upset, but when the phone call ends Edgar is certain that she will act in regards to Tom.

There is a storm that night, and Edgar produces another painting that is of seashells on the beach, but also contains roses.  Edgar also has a vision of Wireman, and realizes that Wireman attempted suicide in the past but was not successful.

Jack, Wireman and Edgar head to the local gallery so that an art dealer can look at Edgar’s paintings.  The meeting is a success, and patrons offer to buy Edgar’s work on the spot.  Edgar also catches the attention of a local art critic named Mary Ire.  Jack, Wireman and Edgar go out to a nice restaurant to celebrate.  On the way home from the restaurant, Wireman suffers a seizure, and Edgar becomes worried.  However, Wireman brushes off Edgar’s concerns, and refuses to speak of his past.  Edgar also receives another message from Elizabeth Eastlake on his answer machine that night, again warning him that the island is not a safe place for his daughter.

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The days pass, and Edgar continues to work on his painting.  He receives a call one day from Pam, who has confronted Tom Riley in regards to his intent to commit suicide.  Pam is angry with Edgar, and does not believe that he has clairvoyant powers.  Edgar tries to convince Pam otherwise, but she will not listen to him.

One afternoon, Edgar agrees to watch Elizabeth because Wireman is busy.  He discovers photos and information in regards to the Eastlake family.  He is also able to draw a picture that shows details of Pam’s life, such as her new television and her new cat.  Edgar relays this information to Pam, but she is still angry and accuses him of spying on her.

Edgar receives a frantic call from Wireman one afternoon.  Wireman has lost the vision in his left eye, and Edgar rushes him to the doctor.  The doctor tries to keep Wireman in the hospital, but Wireman refuses, as he knows his condition is deteriorating.  Wireman tells Edgar about the accident that caused his problems:  he attempted to commit suicide after the death of his wife and daughter, but was unsuccessful, as the bullet was deflected by an apple on his kitchen table.  However, the bullet lodged in his brain, causing his current problems.  Edgar and Wireman also hear of a man named George “Candy” Brown on the news.  Candy Brown was caught abducting a little girl on a mall video camera, and later murders the little girl.  Both men are horrified by the story.

That night, Edgar returns home and tries to sleep.  He is awakened in the middle of the night by the itching on his missing right arm.  Edgar then paints a picture of Candy Brown and the little girl he murdered.  After he is finished, Edgar returns to sleep, the itching in his missing arm gone.  The next morning, Edgar receives a call from Wireman.  Candy Brown passed away his sleep in his jail cell.  The official cause of death is sleep apnea.  Edgar again looks at his painting of Candy Brown, and notices that he painted the accused murder with no mouth or nose.

Edgar realizes that his paintings can alter reality, and that he may be able to help Wireman.  He takes one of the x-rays of Wireman’s brain that shows the bullet that has been lodged in his head for so many years.  He paints a picture of Wireman’s brain minus the bullet, and receives a call from Wireman that his headaches, which he had suffered from ever since his suicide attempt, have disappeared.  However, Wireman still does not have full vision in his left eye.

Realizing that there is more work that needs to be done, Edgar begins to paint Wireman’s portrait.  He also accepts the offer from the local art gallery, and makes plans to invite people, including Pam and his daughters, to his first show.  Edgar begins a series of paintings that he titles “Girl on Ship.”  He realizes that the “girl” is actually his daughter Ilse.  As he paints the ships, he begins to see lettering, namely a P, E and R.  Edgar wonders what the lettering spells, and is determined to find out what these letters will spell out.

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One night, Edgar continues working on Wireman’s portrait. He paints in a frenzy, and has another vision after he is done painting for the night.  He sees two little girls, whom he recognizes as the ghosts of Elizabeth’s deceased twin sisters.  Edgar faints.  When he awakens, he receives a telephone call from Wireman, who tells Edgar that his vision has been restored.

Edgar makes his opening speech to introduce his artwork.  He is nervous at the beginning, but discovers that Dr. Kamen, his psychiatrist from Minnesota, is in the audience.  The speech is a success, and people are demanding that he sell his paintings.  Edgar catches the attention of Mary Ire, a local art critic.  Edgar meets with Ms. Ire, and learns that Elizabeth Eastlake may have also been an artist as a child.

Finally, it is the night of Edgar’s show.  Edgar has made sure that his close friends and family will be attending, but not staying on the island of Duma Key.  Per Elizabeth Eastlake, Edgar also instructs the art gallery to sell his “Girl In a Ship” paintings to separate buyers.

Edgar’s show is a huge success.  He is able to sell all of all paintings, bringing in nearly half a million dollars.  Edgar’s ex-wife, daughters, psychiatrist, Wireman, Jack and even Elizabeth Eastlake attend the show.  However, tragedy strikes when Elizabeth is stricken with a seizure that night. She warns Edgar of a being she calls Perse, and says that “she must be drowned in fresh water.”  Elizabeth also tells Edgar that there is a red picnic basket that he must find. Elizabeth is rushed to the hospital, but passes away that night.

Wireman shows Edgar an article published in the 1930’s in regards to Elizabeth.  The article confirms that Elizabeth was an artist, but gave it up when she was just a four year old child.  Elizabeth also suffered a brain injury similar to Edgar’s, and her artistic ability emerged shortly after her injury.

Edgar returns to his hotel, and seeks momentary comfort in the arms of Pam.  The next morning, Edgar also speaks to Ilse, who tells him that her boyfriend has cheated on her.  Edgar has a heart-to-heart with Ilse, and tells her not to rush things with her boyfriend.  He then sees his friends and family off, and returns to his hotel room.  Edgar receives a message from Wireman telling him that something odd has happened on the island and that he must return right away.

When Edgar returns to his home, he discovers that it is in a shambles.  He also discovers that Jack and Wireman have located the red picnic basket.  The picnic basket contains drawings and paintings that were the work of a young Elizabeth Eastlake.  Edgar realizes that he must find out her story, and that he must use his own artistic ability to do so.  Wireman agrees, but says he will check on Edgar to make sure that nothing happens to him.

Edgar begins to flesh out Elizabeth’s story through a series of drawings.  Her story is familiar and also tragic:  the being known as Perse used Elizabeth’s gifts for her own evil purposes.  When Elizabeth tried to stop her, Perse punished horribly, by murdering her sisters.  Edgar, however, is still unable to come up with a way to stop Perse.  When he returns to the downstairs part of his house, he sees the ship that carries Perse coming towards his house.  Edgar also encounters the ghost of a young man who is intent on harming him.  However, Wireman steps in just in time to save Edgar.

Jack, Wireman and Edgar convene, and Edgar relays what happened to them.  Edgar realizes that the ghost he saw was the fiancee of Elizabeth’s older sister, who was also likely a victim of Perse.  He also receives a call from Tom Riley.  Tom tells Edgar that he is dead, and intends to take Pam with him.  Edgar panics, and calls Pam.  Pam confirms that Tom has committed suicide.  Edgar tells her that she must warn anyone who has purchased his paintings, as Perse’s influence extends far.  Later, Edgar finds out that Dr. Kamen has died from a heart attack after purchasing one of Edgar’s paintings.  Pam assures Edgar that neither she nor their daughters have any of his paintings, but Edgar is still uneasy.

Edgar realizes that he must try to destroy Perse before she can do any more damage, and makes plans with Jack and Wireman to do just that, by the light of day.

Unable to sleep, Edgar awakens and remembers that he gave the drawing titled “Hello” to his daughter Ilse.  He calls Ilse, who has been under the spell of Perse.  Ilse believes Edgar to be dead.  Edgar reassures her that he is still alive, and tells her to burn the drawing.  Ilse complies, and Edgar goes back to sleep, believing his daughter to be safe.

The next morning, Edgar receives a frantic phone call from Pam.  Pam tells him that Ilse is now dead.  It turns out that Ilse has been murdered by Mary Ire, who later commits suicide.  Mary drowned Ilse in the bathtub before killing herself.  Edgar is grief-stricken, but still determined to defeat Perse.

Jack, Edgar and Wireman head to Elizabeth’s childhood home.  They encounter a few tricks, including a lawn jockey that appears to come to life, but are not fooled.  Underneath the stairs of the old mansion, Edgar finds Noveen, Elizabeth’s favorite childhood doll.  Jack is able to use his gift of ventriloquism to have the doll speak, and the doll speaks, even though it is actually the ghost of Nan Melda, Elizabeth’s childhood Nanny.  Nan Melda tells them that Edgar must paint, which he does.  Edgar spends hours in a painting frenzy.  The pictures reveal what happened to Elizabeth and her family, and how to defeat Perse.  Perse can only be defeated by drowning the doll that contains her essence in fresh water.  That doll is located in a cistern under the house.

The three men locate the pool, and Edgar locates the doll that represents Perse.  After a struggle, he is able to trap her into a flashlight so that she can be contained.   The three then head back to the house that Wireman shared with Elizabeth.  Edgar insists on heading back to Big Pink.  When he arrives, he encounters what appears to be his dead daughter, Ilse.  However, this is one final trick of Perse’s, and Edgar is able to resist, and defeats the entity one last time.

Some time later, Wireman travels to Minnesota to meet up with Edgar.  It is also revealed that Jack is currently attending college and has moved some miles from Duma Key.  Edgar and Wireman head out to a lake in Minnesota, which happens to be quite deep.  There, they drown the flashlight containing the essence of Perse, so that the creature is unable to do any further damage.  Wireman tells Edgar that he is heading to Mexico, where he plans on opening a resort.  He invites Edgar to join him.  However, Edgar never joins Wireman, as Wireman dies of a heart two months later.

Edgar travels to Duma Key, with the intent on creating one final piece of artwork.  And he paints one last picture:  a picture of a storm destroying the island.  After the painting is completed, the wind begins to blow.

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My Thoughts

Well, they say that the third time is the charm…

And I do believe that the nebulous group known as “they” may actually be correct, at least in regards to Duma Key.

See, this is the third read of Duma Key.  And it has taken me three times to finally appreciate it and love it…

I know, bad me!

breaking bad

And there is much to love and appreciate, in regards to this fine book!

First of all, Wireman…

I know he is probably a little old for someone who just turned 21 for the fifth time this year, but boy, does this nerdy blogger have quite the crush on him!

I can just hear him speaking Spanish to me…swoon…

Nero 1

Yes, he reminds of Nero from one of my (and The Master’s) all time favorite TV shows…what can I say?

Oh, and the reference to “water brothers” and Stranger in a Strange Land…that made me want to give him a wet, sloppy kiss that Duncan the pup at arms would envy!

And speaking of great characters, let’s not forget the main one, aka Edgar Freemantle.

I love Wireman, but I think I may have found another spirit animal in Eddie.

Obviously, the art.  I may work in the exciting industry of tax resolution and rock to the beat of IRS hold muzak, but I do consider myself to be an artist.  I even try my hand occasionally at the works of The Master…

Duma key acrylic

While I may not (thankfully) have had a traumatic brain injury, I feel a kinship with Edgar.  Like me, he used his art to draw himself back into the world, in a manner of speaking.  Like me, he often does not feel like he is complete, unless he is working on a piece of artwork.  And art really does draw some of us back into the “real” world.  Most artists, if their capacity to create more art is taken away from them, would probably wither like a flower that lacks sunshine and water.  I can relate when Edgar describes his need to paint as an “itch”;  often, I feel that itch myself.  And if I ignore it too long, it becomes unbearable and has to be let out, in the form of a painting, drawing or possibly a woodburning.  And it must be let out, for the sake of myself and anyone who is stuck caring for me and loving me.

And again, I have to give a shout out to Sai King for his treatment of mental illness in Duma Key.  King has dealt with this topic in a few of his other books, including Lisey’s Story, The Dark Tower series, Dreamcatcher and several others.  As always, King deals with the topic in a sensitive, thoughtful way and does not disappoint.  Wireman, Edgar and Elizabeth all suffer from various mental illnesses, including aphasia, depression and Alzheimer’s disease.  However, King is able to make these characters much more than their illnesses, and yet still make them sympathetic because of their various illnesses.  He does a fantastic job with Elizabeth in particular, who suffers from Alzheimer’s disease.  My grandmother has suffered from Alzheimer’s disease for nearly four years now, so I am familiar with the lows of this condition.  There is nothing more heart-breaking that someone who has known you for your whole life being terrified of you because she thinks you are a complete stranger, and having to lie to that woman and telling her that yes, Grandpa is just in the next room and he will be back soon.  But the disease also has highs:  like Elizabeth, my grandmother is occasionally able to remember the past in perfect clarity, bringing back hope, at least momentarily.  And to paraphrase a certain writer, hope is a good thing, and also the best of things.

Red 1

While I think that Perse is a terrifying King villain, I consider this book to be more tragic than scary.  Again, that is the power of Stephen King:  he can scare you into a change of pants, and he can also make you reach for the tissue box in almost the very same breath.

For example, there is the scene that depicts the final confrontation with Perse, who comes to Edgar under the guise of his now deceased daughter, Ilse.  Yes, the scene was spooky.  The description of the apparition as a sandstorm did make me shiver.  But it also made me feel sad, seeing how tempted Edgar was by Perse, at the chance to see his daughter one last time. And then he literally watches his deceased daughter turn to dust. So Sai King creeped me out, and then gave me a case of the feelsies a few minutes later…yes, he is that talented!

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I think that Duma Key must King’s most tragic book, or at least in the top five.  So.  Many.  Feelsies.

For example, Wireman.  Yes, we are back on that subject again.  But Wireman is one of King’s most tragic characters, along with being one of my book boyfriends.  He loses his wife and child literally moments apart from each other, attempts to commit suicide but is saved by an apple and then begins to lose his vision.  He also loses his one remaining family member when Elizabeth Eastlake passes away.  However, Edgar cures him of his blindness.  But he still passes away from a heart attack while dickering over tomatoes in Mexico…greedy old ka, as a certain character from  a certain other King series would say.

roland and susan 2

And the ending to this one.  King has had some interesting endings in his books (Under the Dome, The Stand, 11/22/63 and The Dark Tower series all come to mind, for various reasons).  But I think that the ending to Duma Key is probably his saddest.  Yes, the evil is technically defeated, after Perse is drowned in fresh water.  But did anyone really win?  Elizabeth did not, she was Perse’s last victim.  Wireman did not, he may have been cured of his blindness, but he died after escaping Duma Key and trying to make a life for himself.  Edgar was perhaps the biggest loser of all:  he lost his marriage, his daughter and his new-found calling as an artist.  He also lost Wiremen, who could be considered the last of his remaining family. So it turns out that Edgar has only one choice:  return to where it all started, and destroy it, no matter the cost.  And at that point Edgar has nothing to lose, as everything has been taken from him.  And he does just that:  destroys Duma Key, and ultimately puts his hobby to good use so that no one else will be subject to the suffering.

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Any kind of creative process, whether it be writing a novel, painting on a blank canvass, composing a song or any other piece of art, often requires an enormous sacrifice.  The artist gives a piece of himself or herself, so that something new is born.  And often, demons are roused during this process, and must be faced.  So the creative process can be a battle.  Duma Key symbolizes this perfectly, reminding us of the pain, and also utter joy, that is the creative process.

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Connections:

Just for the fun of it, here are some of the connections to King’s other work that I found in Duma Key:

-Edgar’s abilities are strikingly similar to Patrick Danville’s abilities, another King character who is also an artist.  Patrick Danville is a character in the novels Insomnia and The Dark Tower, and he also has the ability to alter reality through his art.

Insomnia 4

The number 19 makes an appearance in Duma Key.  Edgar’s email address ends with the number 19, and the room number to Pam’s hotel room is 847 (the digits add up to 19).  The number 19 plays a huge role for Roland and his friends in the last three books of The Dark Tower series.

The-dark-tower-19

-Edgar shares the same last name as Abagail Freemantle, who is a main character in the novel The Stand.  The two also seem to share similar clairvoyant abilities.

Mother Abigail

-The house that Edgar lives in when he relocates to Duma Key is described as being pink in color.  In the novel Wizard and Glass, there is an object known as Maerlyn’s Grapefruit that is also pink in color, and whoever looks into that object gains clairvoyant abilities that are similar to the ones Edgar gains after he moves to Duma Key.

Maerlyn's rainbow

-Ilse tells Edgar that Perse talks to her through the drain in the kitchen sink.  This is similar to how Pennywise the Clown communicates to his intended victims in the novel It, and may suggest that Perse and Pennywise are the same type of creature.

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Man Crush Monday for 3/23/15

 

Oh, Monday.  What a killjoy you are.  Almost as much as killjoy as rocks in my shoes after a trip to the beach.  Or the strawberry and vanilla parts in Neopolitan ice cream.  Or a roommate walking in and interrupting your hookup…sigh.

Man Crush Monday 1

But at least we have Man Crush Monday!  Man Crush Monday is kind of like Paris…we will always have it!

Casablanca

 

I am a sucker for knights in shining armor.  They make me melt, for some reason.  I may be a self-proclaimed feminist, but I still love the idea of a hero who is willing to risk everything for what matters to him.  The best of the good guys, in my book.

white-knight

 

Stephen King has the ability to write some really awesome bad guys (Eldred Jonas, Jim Rennie, etc).  But King also has the ability to write some memorable good guys.  And we are talking about good guys, not anti heroes who still do good (sorry, Roland!)

So meet the subject of this week’s Man Crush Monday:  Ralph Roberts from Insomnia!

Insomnia 1

Ralph Roberts is the consummate knight in shining armor.  When I was growing up, my grandfather was my knight in shining armor.  It seemed he always knew what to do and what to say, even when things were difficult.  And he was willing to do anything for his family.  I know that he made sacrifices for my mom, my uncle and grandmother back in the day so that they all could have happy, healthy lives.  He also fought in World War II and risked his life for his country, even though it may have meant that he would either return in a body bag or return with severe injuries (thankfully, he returned healthy…otherwise, you might not be reading this blog!)  In other words, in the words of a certain famous singer, he walked on water.

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Ralph Roberts also walked on water.  To me, this guy could never do any wrong.  He was not a willing participant, at least at first, in the quest set up for him by whatever forces control our universe.  Like Frodo, Sam, Bilbo and the other hobbits, he just wanted to stay home and live out the last of his days in peace (when you are 68 years old, you have earned that right).  But fate had other plans for him.  And Ralph stepped up, and he did it admirably.  He saved the life of a certain young man who would later go to play his part in the quest of a well known anti hero.  He also saved the lives of a few hundred people from a madman while he was at it.  And rubbed elbows with Connie Chung, too.

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However, these accomplishments came at a major cost.  Ralph held up his end of the bargain, but also forced The Fates (Clotho and Lachesis) to uphold their end of the bargain.  Ralph was unwilling to work with the Fates until they promised him that the life of the daughter of his young neighbor would also be saved.  And this required Ralph to sacrifice himself when the time came.  And Ralph does exactly that.  In other words, the best of the good guys.  My grandfather would have admired him, in fact.

So without further ado, here is Ralph Roberts!


Name;  Ralph Roberts

Profession:  Retired, but was a traveling salesman.  His persuasion abilities come in handy when he really wants something, like to trade his life for the life of a child.

Relationship status:  Widowed from Caroline.  He later falls in love with and marries Lois Chasse, but Caroline’s voice is still a major influence, often guiding him through difficult decisions.

So it’s only a little bit complicated…

Known associates:  Obviously, Caroline Roberts, and later Lois Chasse.  He values the opinions of everyone, especially women.

Dorrance Marstellar.  Old Dor was almost a major influence on his quest as the voice of his deceased wife Caroline.  Short Timers can be a little dense, and Old Dor tries to be as understanding as possible when offering his somewhat cryptic guidance.

Helen Deepeneau.  Ralph rescued her from her abusive husband, and went up against the asshole when no one else would.  Later, he sacrificed himself so that the life of her daughter may be spared.  His actions against Ed Deepenau even earned him accolades from feminist groups…talk about a true knight!

Enemies:  The Knights of the Round Table had them, and Ralph Roberts definitely has them.  It comes with the the territory when you are a bad ass.

Crimson King.  Not a good enemy to have, especially when this enemy is (likely) immortal, all powerful and brags about his eons long influence in your hometown of Derry, Maine.

Ed Deepenau.  When you have no destiny, you are almost as formidable as the Crimson King (see above).  And when a certain dirty, bald doctor cuts your “balloon string” (essentially, your spiritual lifeline) off, then watch out!  This does not make you happy when your elderly neighbor interferes with your plans, whether those plans are to beat your wife senseless, or to blow up a civic center that is holding a pro choice rally (well placed irony is always the best).


So there you have it, ladies…Ralph Roberts!  One of the last of the true knights…he has even been compared to the famous Sir Lancelot!  Ralph Roberts is definitely a keeper…I can understand why someone may lose sleep over him!

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So enjoy this week’s Man Crush Monday, and tune in next week to swoon over more literary characters that you wish were real!

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My Top 7 Stephen King Boyfriends

I can just picture myself standing in front of the audience at some kind of 12 step program meeting, if I actually chose to seek help for my excessive nerdiness (ha, that will never happen).  But I have fun with hypothetical situations, so here it goes:

My name is Leah McLaughlin, and I fall hopelessly in love with characters in books.  Yes, you read that right.  I develop crushes on imaginary people.  And no, these are not necessarily books that have been adapted into movies, although having the the image of some (preferably) handsome actor to go along with the character in question can certainly help!

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One of the features of the excessive nerdiness mentioned above is that I have a great imagination.  Almost too great, in fact.  But most of the time, it comes in handy.  Especially when trying to draw an image in my mind of someone who I will never meet and who may or may not be brought to life on screen.

So yes, I have book boyfriends, even though I am happily married.  And don’t worry, my football boyfriend and my actor boyfriend are pretty understanding.  Oh yeah, my husband is pretty understanding too…I lucked out in that department.

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Now, Stephen King has a long list of male characters.  Not all of them are ones who I would want to date (Roland Deschain just has no sense of humor), much less even meet (ugh, Norman Daniels, anyone?)  Let’s face, a lot of King characters tend to be assholes…and that is fine, it makes some of them extremely memorable (Jim Rennie, for instance).

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However, King also shows the good side of humanity.  He makes one believe in people again (sometimes).  His characters often go above and beyond the call of duty, often making enormous sacrifices for the greater good.  This includes both male and female characters.  But some of the men depicted are of particularly noble character.  Again, they make one believe in people.  And if that is not a quality worthy in a would be suitor, then I don’t know what is.

So, here are my top 7 Stephen King book boyfriends:

7)  Ralph Roberts (Insomnia)

Yes, Ralph Roberts is old.  And old is not supposed to be sexy…or is it?

While Ralph Roberts may be old, that doesn’t mean he is not book boyfriend material!  Come on, the man risked him life to save the life of Patrick Danville, a little boy who will turn out to be very important to a certain gunslinger.  Oh, and did I mention he saved the lives 200+ other people as well, from a madman who intended on crashing a plane into a large convention?  And Ralph also faced down the Crimson King (arguably the ultimate bad guy in the King universe) and lived to tell the tale.  On a smaller scale, he had the courage to actually not be a bystander during a so-called domestic dispute, and  intervened and possibly saved his neighbor’s life.  And Ralph confronted the abuser, reminding the abuser (and his victim) just who was the real victim.  And all this was done by a man in his 70’s.  Men half of his age would have ran from such a calling, but Ralph took to the task admirably and never backed down.

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Ralph is compared to Sir Lancelot several times in the book.  In other words, people see him as noble and brave.  Ralph’s final act of sacrifice was textbook proof of bravery and nobility, as he sacrificed his own life so that the life of a child would be spared.  And nobility and bravery are very sexy attributes in a Stephen King book boyfriend.

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6)  Henry Leyden (Black House)

The inclusion of Henry Leyden as a Stephen King book boyfriend is so obvious.  So obvious, in fact, THAT A BLIND MAN COULD SEE IT!

Henry Leyden, aka The Wisconsin Rat, aka Symphonic Stan, aka (and this one was my personal favorite) George Rathbun, is indeed a blind man.  However, he often sees more than many with 20-20 vision, as his senses (other than his sight) are extremely acute.  He is also a sort of mentor to Jack Sawyer, as he convinces Jack Sawyer to use his detective skills to help solve a series of gruesome child murders in French Landing, WI.  Henry also uses his acute sense of hearing to help identify the murderer, and ultimately pays for it with his life.  Anyone who would give his life for the protection of the citizens should be classified a hero.  And heroic acts are also swoon worthy acts, in my book.

Henry Leyden also continues his heroics from beyond the grave, as he aids in the rescue of Tyler Marshall after his death.  The willingness to protect others, even after death, is an attribute every book boyfriend (and real life boyfriend, for that matter) should possess.  Hence the inclusion of Henry Leyden on this list.

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5) Jake Epping (11/22/63)

There is just something sexy about English teachers.  Maybe its because they are smart.  Maybe its because they are (mostly) well read.  Or maybe I am just really, really nerdy…

Jake Epping is an English teacher.  He also knows how to dance (*swoon*).  Oh, and did I mention he is willing to risk his life to save the life of John F. Kennedy?  Jake travels back in time in 11/22/63 and is pretty single minded in his determination.  He even learns how to fire a gun.  Not only that, he is man who cares deeply about the lives of his students, among others, and attempts to better the lives of those around him, which ends up costing him (and others) dearly, as the past clearly does not want to be changed.  But any man who is determined, and caring to boot, is definitely boyfriend worthy.

Jake also meets a woman and falls in love with her.  Jake teaches Sadie that sex is actually a good thing and not something to be feared.  He also proves to her that some men can be brave, as he saves her life when her deranged ex husband attempts to kill her.  However, Sadie’s life is sacrificed when Jake does manage to save the life of John F. Kennedy.  Jake is able to erase the alternate timeline, but decides it would be selfish to travel back in time again, and does not attempt to reunite with Sadie.  He encounters Sadie as an old woman in 2011, and still sees her as beautiful.  And any man who can see inner beauty even after the physical body ages is worthy of inclusion on this list.

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4)  Richie Tozier (It)

Let’s face it, I am a sucker for a guy with a sense of humor.  And luckily, I am married to one of those guys.  In fact, our senses of humor tend to feed off of each other, and we are lucky enough to have simultaneous sarcasms sometimes!  I know, probably a bit more than you wanted to know, but a sense of humor is really sexy!

Many of King’s characters have a sense of humor.  And I think King himself also has a wicked sense of humor.  And this sense of humor comes through in a character like Richie Tozier.  Richier Tozier is on of the Losers in It.  Richie is not someone who should be pegged as a “Loser” but his mouth (along with his coke bottle thick glasses) make him a prime target for bullies.  Richie is nicknamed Trashmouth as a child, and lives up to the nickname admirably.  He bands together with the other misfits in his school, and he and his friends try to stop the child murdering monster known as Pennywise the Clown that has inhabited their hometown of Derry, Maine, for centuries.  Richie is the jester of the group, and his antics make the summer a little more bearable for the children as they battle the monster.  Richie’s sense of humor and antics even come in handy against Pennywise himself, providing a distraction to the monster so that they children are able to escape.  Richie reprises his role as an adult, and his sense of humor is able to bind the adults together again so that they can face the monster a second time, and successfully defeat it.

Richie not only has a sense of humor, but is also incredibly courageous.  He stands with Bill Denbrough against the werewolf the two encounter, and also helps Bill confront what Bill believes to be the ghost of his dead brother (who was actually a victim of Pennywise).  When they are adults, Pennywise captures Bill Denbrough’s soul in the final showdown, but Richie is able to rescue Bill, allowing the Losers to kill the monster.  In other words, Richie is really brave and with a sense of humor to boot…what’s not to love about that combination?  Its a combination that earns a spot on this list.

Richie Tozier

 

3)  Jack Sawyer (Black House)

This may sound strange, but adult Harry Potter Daniel Radcliffe is hot, and it feels weird to say that!  I still seem him in my mind as a twelve year old kid battling magical creatures with other twelve year old kids, so I feel kind of perverted when I swoon over him, even though he is in his twenties now (which is perfectly legal but whose keeping track anyway?)

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And I feel the same way about including Jack Sawyer on this list.  Part of me will always picture him as a twelve year old kid battling magical creatures, even though he is around 35 in Black House.  And I will continue to think fondly of him as “Jacky.”  But Jacky, like Harry Potter, grew up.  And Jacky Jack grew up to be a fine, upstanding citizen.  And handsome, to boot!  But Jack never completely loses his childhood, and is able to travel back to the magical world he calls The Territories to help save the town of French Landing, WI from a serial killer who is targeting children.  Jack is another King character who is similar to the knights of yore, as he is selfless and constantly thinking of others (he even reads to a blind man in his spare time).  Even though Jack is a “retired” police officer, he teams with the local police force to help catch the killer.  He puts his life on the line for the good of the children.  And Jack pays the ultimate price for his police work, as he pays with his life at the end of the book.  Even though Jack appears to have been resurrected in The Territories, he is still a noble, self sacrificing hero, much like Ralph Roberts.  Hence his inclusion on this list.

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2)  Eddie Dean (The Dark Tower series)

As I have said before, I am a sucker for a sense of humor.  And I like guys that can protect me.  I am sure Roland Deschain would do a pretty good job of protecting me from pretty anything I could think of, but we all know he is lacking in the humor department.  So I would probably get pretty bored with him.  Or end up driving him crazy…it just wouldn’t work out!

But not so for Roland’s partner in crime, Eddie Dean.  Eddie Dean has a sense of humor.  And he is as tough as nails.  How many people can fight off mobsters when they are buck naked and just found out that their brother died of a heroin overdose?  Very few people are that tough.  And he kicked a heroin habit to boot.  So that’s someone I could show weakness around, and not feel judged in the slightest.  And being able to be vulnerable around someone and not feel judged for your weaknesses is just plain sexy, I have no other way to put it.

It is also stated throughout the series that Eddie likes to be needed.  While I consider myself to be a strong independent woman, I also love when I can count on a guy, whether I need the pickle jar removed, or just someone to cry with over a bad day.  Dependability is perhaps the sexiest quality in a partner, and is certainly worth the spot on this list.

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And now for my top Stephen King book boyfriend…

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1)  Nick Andros (The Stand)

Yes, my number 1 boyfriend in a Stephen King Book is Nick Andros.  Yes, he is a deaf mute…trust me, I have my reasons for wanting to hop into bed with him!

Nick

Now that the number 1 choice has sunk in, let’s discuss the reasoning behind it.  And the reasoning behind is pretty sound (no pun intended).

First of all, I think being smart is a sexy quality.  And Nick Andros has plenty of smarts.  He was orphaned and basically left with nothing as a young child.  As stated before, he is also deaf and unable to speak.  This is a handicap now, but Nick was a child in the days before computer software, tablets or even decent special education classes.  In other words, kids like Nick were never given a chance.  However, Nick overcame all the odds and learned how to read and write.  Writing then became his main form of communication, as ASL  was not mainstream at the time.  Nick did have a good teacher, but only someone with a lot of equipment upstairs would be able to manage to learn how to read and write, when that person has been living in a veil of silence and cut off from the rest of their world for his entire life.  Mmmm, brains…as the zombies would say.

Nick is also resourceful.  Being resourceful is always a good thing, but when the world gets ravaged by the super flu, being resourceful is very important.  Nick is able to keep his group of survivors alive as they travel to the Boulder Free Zone.  This is no small feat, as the band of survivors includes Tom Cullen, a mildly mentally handicapped man who has a propensity to get into trouble.  But the leader comes out in Nick, and the man without a literal voice still manages to make himself heard…sexy!

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But  my favorite thing about Nick is his compassion and his willingness to sacrifice for the greater good.  His compassion is evident when he meets Tom Cullen.  Tom Cullen is mildly mentally handicapped, and can also be a bit of a handful.  However, Nick takes him underneath his wing, and possibly ends up saving his life, as Tom was a target for bullies and acts of cruelty.  The two have one of the most enduring friendships in literature.  And Nick is another self-sacrificing Stephen King hero.  He is able to find the bomb that was planted by Harold and Nadine, and manages to save the lives of most who attended the ill fated meeting.  However, Nick, like so many others in the King universe, pays the ultimate price with his life.  His act of bravery is one that helps ensure the safety of the remaining Free Zone members and his death will never be forgotten by his friends.  But Nick’s compassion is something that continues to live beyond the grave.  His ghost appears to Tom Cullen, and aides Tom in rescuing Stu Redman, so that Stu can return to Fran and be a father to their children.  Not only is compassion a trait that can live on for a long time, it is and extremely sexy quality that Nick Andros possesses in spades!

Obviously, sexy is in the eye of the beholder.  And there are so many qualities that can make a man sexy and its hard to zero in on any particular quality.  But Nick Andros is as complete a package as you will find:  smart, charismatic and compassionate.  What can I say, I like them well rounded.  And well rounded, complete packages are deserving of the number 1 spot on this list.

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Valentine’s Day is coming up.  You know what that means…its time to grab one of these books on this list, and snuggle by the fire with one of my Stephen King book boyfriends.  Don’t worry, we are in an open relationships, and I I enjoy sharing what I love.  So, you’re welcome, and enjoy!

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